Conservation

Sarah Higgins and owl

Sarah Higgins and owl

There is a tremendous need for environmental conservation in Kenya. One of Kenya’s most valuable resources is its wildlife – the economy depends upon the tourist industry drawn to the varied safaris on offer. But Kenya’s most precious natural resources, upon which both the wildlife and the people depend, is its trees and water – both vastly over harvested. Only 1.5% of Kenya is still forested (instead of the minimum 10% needed to support a healthy ecosystem) and Kenya is still enduring a severe drought for the third year in a row.

Kijani Kenya Trust recognises that the health of the environment impacts the health of the people. If communities are unable to access water; health and hygiene are impacted and domestic crops of nutritional food die. However, unregulated pumping from the rivers dries them up prematurely, as many communities in Laikipia have discovered, however desperation forces families to continue draining the rivers. More and more families are planting trees around their homes, but the rate of planting is far behind the rapid rate of forest depletion due to illegal tree harvesting for firewood or export.

Kijani has supported Kenya’s environment in a variety of ways from tree planting to water conservation.

Gataunyaga School

Teaching Conservation in one of Kenya’s semi arid rural areas. The project we are carrying out at this school not only assists the school but also teaches the children by example on how to harvest rain water for irrigation, building simple but effective toilets and tree planting and maintenance.

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